>
Swatting attacks increase security concerns across Silicon Valley
May 13, 2019

From the Wall Street Journal:

One January night this year an emergency dispatch operator in Palo Alto, Calif., fielded a call from a man who said he had shot his wife and then tied up his children inside his house, where he had several pipe bombs. After a tense period in which police officers surrounded the house, out came the owner, a senior Facebook executive who said there was no shooting and that he had no idea what was going on.

The call was a hoax, but not an isolated incident.

Just over two weeks later, an Instagram executive at his home in San Francisco was also the target of a swatting attack, in which the perpetrator masquerades as a certain individual and calls up local law enforcement, claiming to have committed violent crimes at the target's address.

The incidents show why safety concerns are rising across Silicon Valley, prompting tech companies to allocate more dollars to executive security.

Continue reading at the Wall Street Journal...

You may also like

Seniors targeted by genetic-testing scam

"Capitalizing on the growing popularity of genetic testing – and fears of terminal illness – scammers are persuading seniors to take two types of genetic screenings."

Over 100 million users affected in Capital One data breach

"A software engineer in Seattle hacked into a server holding customer information for Capital One."

Siri's listening more often than you realize

"There have been countless instances of recordings featuring private discussions between doctors and patients, business deals, seemingly criminal dealings, sexual encounters, and so on."