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Four in 10 Americans struggle to pay bills
July 8, 2019

From the Washington Post:

Sommer Johnson thought everything was finally coming together for her last year. She was engaged, working full time and doing well in online college classes when her fiance's mother died a week before their wedding day triggering a series of large and unexpected expenses that left her struggling to pay her bills and brought her to the verge of bankruptcy.

"I keep hearing this is one of the best economies we've ever had and unemployment is down, especially among African Americans, which I am," said Johnson, 39, who lives in Douglasville, Ga., an Atlanta suburb. "I'm looking around going, 'Where is this boom?' From where I sit, this doesn't look like the best economy ever."

The economic expansion this week became the longest in U.S. history, surpassing the 1990s boom, which lasted exactly a decade.

The stock market is at record levels, with the Dow Jones industrial average closing at a new high Wednesday ahead of the July 4 holiday, and President Trump has made the economy's strong performance a centerpiece of his reelection campaign.

But this expansion has been weaker and its benefits distributed far more unevenly than in previous growth cycles, leaving many Americans in a vulnerable position.

Continue reading at the Washington Post...

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