For lower-paid workers, the robot overlords have arrived
May 2, 2019

From the Wall Street Journal:

It's time to stop worrying that robots will take our jobs – and start worrying that they will decide who gets jobs.

Millions of low-paid workers' lives are increasingly governed by software and algorithms. This was starkly illustrated by a report last week that Amazon.com tracks the productivity of its employees and regularly fires those who underperform, with little human intervention.

"Amazon's system tracks the rates of each individual associate's productivity and automatically generates any warnings or terminations regarding quality or productivity without input from supervisors," a law firm representing Amazon said in a letter to the National Labor Relations Board, as first reported by technology news site The Verge. Amazon was responding to a complaint that it had fired an employee from a Baltimore fulfillment center for federally protected activity, which could include union organizing. Amazon said the employee was fired for failing to meet productivity targets.

Continue reading at the Wall Street Journal...

You may also like

We could see an online 'do not track' registry

"Legislation to stop tech companies from tracking users online is finding new momentum as Congress seeks to crack down on big tech's privacy practices..."

FCC wants phone companies to start blocking robocalls by default

"If the government's new plan works, the number of robocalls you receive may go down in the near future."

Swatting attacks increase security concerns across Silicon Valley

"Tech companies are spending more on protecting personnel as executives are targeted at their homes."