Facebook's '10-Year Challenge' is just a harmless meme – right?
January 23, 2019

From Wired:

If you use social media, you've probably noticed a trend across Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter of people posting their then-and-now profile pictures, mostly from 10 years ago and this year.

My flippant tweet began to pick up traction. My intent wasn't to claim that the meme is inherently dangerous. But I knew the facial recognition scenario was broadly plausible and indicative of a trend that people should be aware of. It's worth considering the depth and breadth of the personal data we share without reservations.

Of those who were critical of my thesis, many argued that the pictures were already available anyway. The most common rebuttal was: "That data is already available. Facebook's already got all the profile pictures."

Of course they do. In various versions of the meme, people were instructed to post their first profile picture alongside their current profile picture, or a picture from 10 years ago alongside their current profile picture. So, yes: These profile pictures exist, they've got upload time stamps, many people have a lot of them, and for the most part they're publicly accessible.

But let's play out this idea...

Imagine that you wanted to train a facial recognition algorithm on age-related characteristics and, more specifically, on age progression (e.g., how people are likely to look as they get older). Ideally, you'd want a broad and rigorous dataset with lots of people's pictures. It would help if you knew they were taken a fixed number of years apart—say, 10 years.

Continue reading at Wired...

You may also like

Watchdog says FBI has access to about 640M photographs

"The figure reflects how the technology is becoming an increasingly powerful law enforcement tool."

12 million patients' financial and medical information may have been exposed in potential breach

"The system contained sensitive data, including credit card numbers, bank account information, medical information, and Social Security numbers, Quest said."

U.S. now requiring visa applicants to give social media info

"The U.S. now wants to know the social-media user names of people applying for visas, part of stepped up screening of foreign visitors and immigrants."